“When I was down beside the sea
A wooden spade they gave to me.
To dig the sandy shore.”
Robert Louis Stevenson, A Child’s Garden of Verses

They–whoever they were–clearly did this child a good turn. They brought him to a good place, and they gave him a good ‘toy’–if we call it a toy.

The best ‘play’ is a kind of first exercise in the deeper things of life: such as playing house, or playing army. Or digging in the earth.

Children have a kind of natural fascination with many things, some of them good, some of them not. How they play, what they play and with whom they play will either bring out or pare back these fascinations.

Current customs, particularly because of the technologies involved, have taken an alarming turn toward replacing play with entertainment. Real play might be entertaining, but it is not simply entertainment. Watching a screen, or even pushing buttons on a screen–even though they be called ‘games’–fall short of being real play. Such is not how to have a first exercise in real life.

Plato insisted that we must be attentive to what and how children play. It might not be feasible completely to sidestep current technology-driven practices.

But it is still within our power to cultivate children’s good natural proclivities. In summer recreation and summer vacation we can good opportunity to minimize the technology, and to emphasize natural contexts for play. They are often right at hand. Our children’s response might surprise us. And one day, they might thank us.

R.L Stevenson (1850-1894) is the great Scottish author of Treasure Island, Kidnapped, A Child’s Garden of Verses, and other classics.

Image: Ruth Mary Hallock

NOTE: Next Wednesday I will be finishing a retreat at a Benedictine monastery in Oklahoma. I must skip that week’s Wednesday quote; please excuse my first skip in almost four years.
ALS0, BETHANY WEEKEND: We are happy and grateful that the first Bethany Weekend is full. We will let you know when the next weekend is scheduled.

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Husband, father, and professor of Philosophy. Bacon from Acorns springs from one conviction: there is an ancient wisdom about how to live the good life in our homes, with our families; and it is worth our time to hearken to it. Let’s rediscover it together. Learn more.

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